Merry Christmas Day

Happy Orthodox Christmas Day 2023

Orthodox Christmas Day

Happy Orthodox Christmas Day 2023: Orthodox Christmas Day marks the arrival of the Savior in the flesh – Jesus Christ. Orthodox Christmas Day was first celebrated in the Russian Empire, then called Orthodox Christianity. Today, Orthodox Christmas Day remains as a Christian public holiday marking the Nativity and the birth of Jesus Christ.

Orthodox Christmas Day is also known as Julian calendar Christian day. The Orthodox Church considers it to be a new year of rebirth and enlightenment for humanity. It is also a day to honor the Virgin Mary and the whole of Christianity, as well as to celebrate the victory of good over evil. Orthodox Christmas Day celebration is one of the four traditional annual religious celebrations on the Julian calendar, also known as the Orthodox calendar. The main Orthodox Christmas Day festival includes a huge family gathering in the evening to give gifts, pray for the well-being of the family, and to celebrate the victory of good over evil.

Happy Orthodox Christmas Day 2023

Do you want to know what holiday is tomorrow? Orthodox Christmas Day celebrates the birth of Jesus Christ as a miracle, as recorded in the Bible. Orthodox Christians believe that the Holy Son of God experienced a wonderful encounter with the Magi following His baptism at the time of Jesus’ birth, as recorded in the Gospel of Luke. The Nativity, which is also called Pasch or Bethlehem, is also commemorated on this day. The Holy Family’s home, known as the House of the Holy Family, is decorated with flowers, candles and lanterns and marked with special icons and pictures of the Virgin Mary, the star known as Omega (or Polaris), and the stone rolled away from the globe by the Magi.

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Orthodox Christmas Day

Unlike the Catholic Church, the Orthodox Church does not celebrate the Nativity or the Birth of Jesus in December 25th. The Orthodox Church celebrates the birth of Jesus Christ on the feasts of St. Nicholas, St. Valentine’s Day, St. Yule, or on any other special occasion that falls under the feast calendar of a particular Orthodox Church. This fact has caused many Orthodox Christians, especially Orthodox Christians in the United States and Russia, to think of the date of Dec. 25th as an inappropriate date for celebrating the birth of Jesus Christ. In addition, the Orthodox Church observes a longer fasting period during the celebration of St. Nicholas’ Day (called nashchek) that includes three days after Christmas.

Orthodox Easter
Orthodox Easter

 

Many Christians celebrate Orthodox Christmas Day in much the same way as the Orthodox Church. Common celebrations include foods like meat and fish, as well as fruit and vegetable dishes. The celebration of the feast of St. Nicholas can be traced back to the fourth century, when the Church was established in the region of what is now Ukraine. The Church did not convert to Orthodox Christianity until 4 centuries later. Some Christians consider St. Nicholas the most popular saint among the Orthodox Church, due to his popular appeal as a nameless shepherd caring for three children who were thrown into the fireplace by their foster-father. His three children eventually grew up to become the last bishop and arch Bishop of Kiev, and are considered to be among the most venerated icons of St. Nicholas.

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Happy Orthodox Day in 2022

what holiday is tomorrow ? – Unlike Protestants and Islam which observe the birth of Jesus on the fourth Friday of the month, Orthodox Christmas Day is celebrated on the full moon of December 25th. Many Orthodox Christmas Day parades are also held on the eve of Christmas, as well as a multitude of family dinners and family gatherings. In some areas of the world, Orthodox Christmas is celebrated with both church attendance and non-Orthodox Christmas Day celebrations. The Orthodox Christmas Day celebration differs from the non-Orthodox Christmas Day in that the latter uses trees, bells, toys, lights, and banners with Orthodox Christian symbols. Orthodox Christmas Day parades include a huge choir accompanied by priests, Metropolitan Cathedral musicians, priestess along with a contingent of acrobats or dancers.

Orthodox Christmas Day marks the arrival of the Savior in the flesh – Jesus Christ. Orthodox Christmas Day was first celebrated in the Russian Empire, then called Orthodox Christianity. Today, Orthodox Christmas Day remains a Christian public holiday marking the Nativity and the birth of Jesus Christ.

Orthodox Day Celebrate

Orthodox Christmas Day is also known as Julian calendar Christian day. The Orthodox Church considers it to be a new year of rebirth and enlightenment for humanity. It is also a day to honor the Virgin Mary and the whole of Christianity, as well as to celebrate the victory of good over evil. Orthodox Christmas Day celebration is one of the four traditional annual religious celebrations on the Julian calendar, also known as the Orthodox calendar. The main Orthodox Christmas Day festival includes a huge family gathering in the evening to give gifts, pray for the well-being of the family, and to celebrate the victory of good over evil.

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Orthodox Christmas Day celebrates the birth of Jesus Christ as a miracle, as recorded in the Bible. Orthodox Christians believe that the Holy Son of God experienced a wonderful encounter with the Magi following His baptism at the time of Jesus’ birth, as recorded in the Gospel of Luke. The Nativity, which is also called Pasch or Bethlehem, is also commemorated on this day. The Holy Family’s home, known as the House of the Holy Family, is decorated with flowers, candles, and lanterns and marked with special icons and pictures of the Virgin Mary, the star known as Omega (or Polaris), and the stone rolled away from the globe by the Magi.

Orthodox Christmas Day 2022 – Date, Quotes, Status, Sayings & Messages

Unlike the Catholic Church, the Orthodox Church does not celebrate the Nativity or the Birth of Jesus on December 25th. The Orthodox Church celebrates the birth of Jesus Christ on the feasts of St. Nicholas, St. Valentine’s Day, St. Yule, or on any other special occasion that falls under the feast calendar of a particular Orthodox Church.

This fact has caused many Orthodox Christians, especially Orthodox Christians in the United States and Russia, to think of the date of Dec. 25th as an inappropriate date for celebrating the birth of Jesus Christ. In addition, the Orthodox Church observes a longer fasting period during the celebration of St. Nicholas’ Day (called nashchek) that includes three days after Christmas.

 

Many Christians celebrate Orthodox Christmas Day in much the same way as the Orthodox Church. Common celebrations include foods like meat and fish, as well as fruit and vegetable dishes. The celebration of the feast of St. Nicholas can be traced back to the fourth century when the Church was established in the region of what is now Ukraine. The Church did not convert to Orthodox Christianity until 4 centuries later. Some Christians consider St. Nicholas the most popular saint among the Orthodox Church, due to his popular appeal as a nameless shepherd caring for three children who were thrown into the fireplace by their foster father. His three children eventually grew up to become the last bishop and arch Bishop of Kyiv, and are considered to be among the most venerated icons of St. Nicholas.

Unlike Protestants and Islam which observe the birth of Jesus on the fourth Friday of the month, Orthodox Christmas Day is celebrated on the full moon of December 25th. Many Orthodox Christmas Day parades are also held on the eve of Christmas, as well as a multitude of family dinners and family gatherings. In some areas of the world, Orthodox Christmas is celebrated with both church attendance and non-Orthodox Christmas Day celebrations.

The Orthodox Christmas Day celebration differs from the non-Orthodox Christmas Day in that the latter uses trees, bells, toys, lights, and banners with Orthodox Christian symbols. Orthodox Christmas Day parades include a huge choir accompanied by priests, Metropolitan Cathedral musicians, priestesses along with a contingent of acrobats or dancers.

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